Art & Identity in New Orleans

HNRS 109 Spring '18

January 31, 2018
by kbekisz20
0 comments

Giving Up Self

There is a critical line spoken by Edna Pontellier in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening: “I would give up the unessential; I would give my money, I would give my life for my children; but I wouldn’t give myself.” (64) There … Continue reading

January 25, 2018
by John Gregory Brown
0 comments

Creole In A Red Headdress

Olivia’s post led me to this fascinating discussion of Jacques Guillaume Lucien Amans’ painting Creole in A Red Headdress (c.1840). Amans travelled from his native France to New Orleans to find work as a portraiturist, and he was quite successful. As … Continue reading

January 25, 2018
by byrd19
1 Comment

The Tignon Law

  Screen Capture from How To Make Lemonade that depicts paintings of free women of color in tignons   Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas makes it a point very early on to highlight the unique ways in which the city and … Continue reading

January 18, 2018
by gaile17
0 comments

The Wards of New Orleans

There are 17 wards within New Orleans. Originally, these wards were created for political reasons. But while they have been replaced by council districts, the wards still hold a lot of meaning for neighborhood identity within the city.   When researching the wards in … Continue reading

January 18, 2018
by vanderzon21
0 comments

Architecture of New Orleans

As New Orleans’ Tricentennial year approaches, the people of New Orleans celebrate three hundred years of culture, music, art, history, and change. The city’s myriad architectural styles reflect that change within the city’s twenty districts, or wards. Below, I present five typical building types that … Continue reading

January 17, 2018
by John Gregory Brown
0 comments

Madame René de Gas

This is one of my favorite Degas paintings — a portrait of his brother Achille’s wife René, who was nearly blind, that Degas painted while visiting New Orleans. The work hangs in the National Gallery of Art. “Posture, gesture, accessories, and … Continue reading